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Someone Has Led This Child to Believe

Art direction, design, and typesetting for this powerful new memoir from Regina Louise.

 I don’t often get to work on creative narrative works—we do a lot of straight nonfiction and cookbooks—so the opportunity to work on this project was both exciting and challenging.

I don’t often get to work on creative narrative works—we do a lot of straight nonfiction and cookbooks—so the opportunity to work on this project was both exciting and challenging.

 After extensive rounds of drafting and deep conversations about what look this cover should have—should we use a photo of the author? should it be text only? does there need to be any resemblance to her prior book?—these are the final two drafts I presented, both inspired by this truly gutting line from a climactic scene in the book. I loved (and still love) the draft on the left, but this colorway wasn’t quite right for the book, and the thorns were too ominous when rendered in a darker / more dramatic palette. For the final design, we ended up combining the stylized rosebush image on the left with the font from the thorn design.  (Side note: I made the decision to switch up the font because I wanted some part of the cover to reference the 70s—the time period in which the book is grounded—and also for it to stand out among all the recent books with that bold, sans serif type treatment. Apparently  many other designers  had the exact same instinct!)

After extensive rounds of drafting and deep conversations about what look this cover should have—should we use a photo of the author? should it be text only? does there need to be any resemblance to her prior book?—these are the final two drafts I presented, both inspired by this truly gutting line from a climactic scene in the book. I loved (and still love) the draft on the left, but this colorway wasn’t quite right for the book, and the thorns were too ominous when rendered in a darker / more dramatic palette. For the final design, we ended up combining the stylized rosebush image on the left with the font from the thorn design.

(Side note: I made the decision to switch up the font because I wanted some part of the cover to reference the 70s—the time period in which the book is grounded—and also for it to stand out among all the recent books with that bold, sans serif type treatment. Apparently many other designers had the exact same instinct!)

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Extreme Typesetting

Extreme Typesetting

Designing the interior was as exciting and challenging as the cover, which is rare for a narrative book. In many cases, the way the text was rendered on the page was as important as the words themselves to the telling of the story — if not more so. If these snippets don’t make you want to read this book immediately, I don’t know what will!

 And, not unimportantly, the camera loooooves this cover.

And, not unimportantly, the camera loooooves this cover.